It’s beginning to look a lot like exam time….

Once again, it’s exam time.  And, once again, my students have entertained me with their interpretations of what I am teaching in class.  Probably the scariest part is that some of these students whose responses are included below are going to have academic dishonesty charges filed against them for plagiarism…which means when they copy from each other (or from websites, which they are not permitted to consult), they can’t even copy correct information.

Interpretations of Marbury v. Madison:

Marbury v. Madison:  This court case is one of the few in American history that almost everyone knows some background information about.  John Adams attempted to load the House of Representatives and the Senate with all members from his political party.  After a short reviewing process, this was deemed unconstitutional by the American government.

Marbury v. Madison:  It was a court case that dealt with John Adams trying to pack the house and the senate with his own political party.  The case was declared unconstitutional.  It marked the first time the Supreme Court declared an act unconstitutional.  Before the court case the executive and legislative branch was favored but this case proved that the Judicial Branch had an even power in the government.

Marbury v. Madison was a supreme court case that started by William Marbury appointing John Adams as Justice of the Peace, but did not deliver it out right so Marbury went to court for being unconstitutional.  This case established the power of the federal courts to review the federal laws and see when they disobey the constitution.

Marbury v. Madison:  Was the backbone behind article III of the constitution, could invalidate a law by declaring it unconstitutional.  This was important because it helped shape the now known law of checks and balances.

Interpretations of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787:

Northwest Ordinance:  a bill of rights passed by Thomas Jefferson in 1787, banning slavery in newly acquired western territories that were north of the Ohio River, keeping slavery in the south.

The Northwest Ordinance was created to have a plan of action to expand the territories to the pacific.  Making the land west of the Mississippi and North of the Ohio rivers available for expansion.

Interpretations of the Three-Fifths Compromise:

Three-fifths Compromise:  The states came to the conclusion that each slave would be counted as three faiths.

Three-Fifths Compromise:  This was a compromise between the North and the South in 1787 stating that all slaves would be counted as three-fifths of a person.  This would cause uproars in most of the southern states would have more seats cause they have more slaves so they made it on all free slaves.  All slaves will be counted but none will be allowed to vote.  When it is finally finalized it leaves the southern states with more delegates because they have more slaves then the rest of the country.

Three-Fifths Compromise started practice of purchasing slaves and the slave trade thrived in the New World.

The three-fifths compromise was a piece of legislation that stated that when slaves were counted in a census or when they were to be taxed, the slaves would only count as three-fifths of a person.  This was put into practice to make sure that the slaves were always of a little bit less value than their owners; however, they still had to count for something—hence the three-fifths value placed on them.

Interpretations of Pinckney’s Treaty:

Pinckney’s Treaty was a solution to the British hostilities toward America.  The divided views on Washington’s signing of the treaty lead to the creation of the first political parties.

The Pinckney’s Treaty terrified the Spanish; they realized the United States Independence.  The United States also gained the right to search the Mississippi River through this treaty.

Hopewell Furnace (note:  this is a national historic site in southeastern Pennsylvania; it was discussed in class when I showed a PowerPoint presentation with photographs of the property):

Hopewell furnace was the furnace company from the movie on the history channel shown in class they were known for their cast iron furnaces.

Views on politics in the early national period:

When George Washington choose people to serve on the first congress, paid no attention to partisan labels.

The Federalist Party split over the War of 1812.  They did not agree with the Democratic-Republicans starting the war with Britain.  They also did not like Andrew Jackson who was President at the time and started the war and tried to make a law for a one term presidency and tried to rid of the three-fifths compromise.

The Federalist Party never recovered after the war of 1812 when the French went after the British.

In the election of 1800, the Democratic-Republicans thought that if Adams would become president, he would overthrow the government.

The Federalists also established a Federal Reserve Bank which helped states get out of debt.

In the 18th and 19th century the parties would come to realize they need each other’s views if this country was going to survive and not be taken over by a foreign country.

The Federalist Party is pro-creator.

The Democratic-Republican Party will eventually split and turn into two separate parties one being Democratic and the other being the Republican Party

A lot of disputes about the alien and sedition acts are beginning to fuel up.  These disputes end up forming the 12th amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

Alexander Hamilton was well educated and knew a lot about running a campaign to get someone elected.  Hamilton also was speaker of the house.

The Bank of the United States was supposed to be like the Bank of England, which could collect taxes, make loans, burrow money, and issue currency.

George Washington was the first president because of his passion for politics and passion for a free country.  After he was done in the wars his original plan was to retire to Vermont, but his presents were requested for his country working on the constitution.

The federalists tried to keep a good relationship with Britain by letting Britain seize the goods sent from France on American ships in exchange for financial gain, this was known as Jays Treaty.

In the 1830’s I personally would not be a member of the Whig Party.  Why?  The Whig party members are democratic and I am a republican.  Andrew Jackson stood for all the beliefs that there still are today in the Republican Party.  So therefore my opinion of Andrew Jackson and his views are very high.

The Whigs stepped up to be the voice of man in the United States since our constitution was based that every man was free from monarchy rule.

In terms of making the American political system more democratic National Conventions started being held.  At these conventions, antifederalists came and gave their objections.

Although many believed the parties to be evil and threatening to the government, the political fractions gradually became parties.

(election of 1828) This election has an enormous effect of selecting candidates because people were confused and weren’t sure if the man they wanted as their president was really who they thought he was.

(election of 1824)  In the end, Clay became President because of the corrupt bargain.

Corrupt bargain:  The president of the United States elections have had a few incidents where it was believed that the house of representatives cheated out the votes and decided things in regards to themselves.

Since France was at war with itself it made a major threat to our nation.

Feel free to comment on your favorites.

Advertisements

About Karen

History Professor. Baseball fan. Author of two books, one of which I force my students to buy and read. You want me on your Trivial Pursuit team.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to It’s beginning to look a lot like exam time….

  1. I particularly enjoyed the one about Andrew Jackson and the Whig party. I also hope to visit Hopewell Furnace someday.

    • Karen says:

      Larry,

      When you do–try to go during the summer when they have interpretive programs. They aren’t as elaborate as they were when I worked there in the 1980s, but I think you would enjoy the moulding and casting demonstration.

  2. I love this one:

    “The three-fifths compromise was a piece of legislation that stated that when slaves were counted in a census or when they were to be taxed, the slaves would only count as three-fifths of a person. This was put into practice to make sure that the slaves were always of a little bit less value than their owners; however, they still had to count for something—hence the three-fifths value placed on them.”

    Heck — at least they were allowed to count for something, right?

    And this one:

    “The Pinckney’s Treaty terrified the Spanish; they realized the United States Independence. The United States also gained the right to search the Mississippi River through this treaty.”

    First of all, the Spanish sure were slow on the uptake if this was how they learned of US independence. Second, what were they searching for in the river, and how did they accomplish it without scuba gear?

    The Hopewell Furnace one is its own level of classic.

    As for this one:

    “The Federalist Party split over the War of 1812. They did not agree with the Democratic-Republicans starting the war with Britain. They also did not like Andrew Jackson who was President at the time and started the war and tried to make a law for a one term presidency and tried to rid of the three-fifths compromise.”

    all I’ve got is ???????????.

    There are just too many this time!!!!!

    I will say that I’m sure Clay is delighted at his posthumous presidency. I always want to cry for him because he never quite made it despite all his best efforts. Now he appears to have been vindicated. 🙂

  3. Coty B says:

    This one’s a winner!

    “In the 1830’s I personally would not be a member of the Whig Party. Why? The Whig party members are democratic and I am a republican. Andrew Jackson stood for all the beliefs that there still are today in the Republican Party. So therefore my opinion of Andrew Jackson and his views are very high.”

Comments are closed.